for the time will soon come when hobbits will shape the fortunes of all…

Anonymous asked: You play D&D? I seriously doubt that. I bet you don't even know what dice are.

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

rabbitrecycle:

Wait wait wait so you’re telling me

That these things aren’t elaborately shaped slightly mathematical candies?

I’m still gunna check

shit

AS WE ALL KNOW, WE WOMEN CANNOT UNDERSTAND COMPLICATED THINGS LIKE DICE

ONLY MANLY MEN KNOW WHAT DICE ARE

ohsofili:

 I wonder if we’ll ever be put into songs or tales.

boromirs:

Have you ever been called home by the clear ringing of silver trumpets?

shinji420:

get this onto the tumblr radar

repress:

Do you ever want to talk to someone but

1) You feel like you’re bothering them or coming off clingy
2) You don’t have anything to say, you just want to talk to them
3) You don’t know how to hold a conversation to save your life 

gynocologist:

i never stop blogging even when im really upset i just sit there sobbing hitting buttons and reblogging everything

angrypickle:

reunitingmerthur:

What I want to know is how that:

image

image

Turned into this:

image

image

LIKE WHAMBAM THOSE MUSCLES.

magic

the destiny of a great kingdom can rest on those shoulders damn

sugaryumyum:

Harnaam was just 11 years old when the beard started appearing and she spent her teenage years desperately trying to remove it. She would try to remove it by waxing twice a week.

The primary school teaching assistant endured vile abuse at school and would be stared at in the street.  She became so self conscious she refused to leave her house, except to go to lessons. At her lowest point she began self harming and even considered taking her own life.

 But at the age of 16, she found the courage to accept her facial hair after being baptised as a Sikh.  The religion dictates that the body should be left in its natural state and body hair must be left to grow.

Harnaam was determined to show that she was beautiful no matter what she looked like.

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